Regular hours resume on September 7 2021

03/09/2021

Ottawa Public Library will return to regular pre-pandemic hours at most branches starting Tuesday, September 7, 2021 — including Sunday hours at 10 branches and InfoService as of Sunday, September 12.  

Hours are posted at branch entrances and on the Hours and location page of the OPL website.   

Fitzroy Harbour and Vernon branches are reopening after being closed since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020.  

Notice - Carlingwood branch

17/09/2021

The elevator at the Carlingwood branch is currently unavailable.

Rideau branch-Elevator out of service

15/09/2021

The elevator at Rideau is currently out of service for maintenance and repairs. Service will be restored on Monday, September 27th.

Holiday Closure: National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

20/09/2021

All Ottawa Public Library branches will be closed on Thursday, September 30. Access our online services 24/7 on the Ottawa Public Library website.

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Amber Westfall explains her approach to harvesting wild plants

Transcription

Sherry Lalonde: "Hi, my name is Sherry, and I'm the food literacy specialist at Ottawa Public Library. Recently we spoke with Amber Westfall of The Wild Garden for her thoughts on foraging and wildcrafting." Amber Westfall: “If you know where to look, and if you’re not trespassing, there are a surprising amount of greenspaces where you can gather really lovely, healthy, nourishing plants that can supplement peoples’ diet. Foraging in particular has become really trendy, it’s growing in popularity. Chefs are contributing to that which is great, to get that awareness out there. But sometimes peoples’ enthusiasm gets a little bit ahead of their knowledge and then safety sometimes becomes an issue. Spending lots of time in nature, observing, getting to know the land is really important. Having that 100% accurate i.d. is so essential and then all those other little pieces about, is this a safe, appropriate place to harvest from? And then there’s the whole piece of ethics around wild foods. When I do lead plant walks I generally focus on and encourage people to focus on non-native, invasive or just really abundant weedy species. There’s dozens of plants that you can get to know and play with and work with and use for food and medicine and you’re not going to have a negative impact on the environment. What I really strive for in my wild-crafting, my gathering is a kind of regenerative stewardship. So how can I interact with the eco-systems that I’m in, in a way that not just has the least impact but actually eventually has a beneficial impact so that my actions increase biodiversity, increase soil health over time.