Web maintenance: Aug. 5 to 6

04/08/2021

Bibliocommons, our catalogue provider, will be performing system maintenance and will be inaccessible from Aug. 5 to 6 from 10 pm to 4 am. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Temporary closure: Alta Vista

05/08/2021

Due to upgrades to the front entrance, the Alta Vista branch will be closed from July 26 to August 17. There will be no returns or holds pick-up during that time. Alta Vista branch will reopen August 18 at 10 am.   

Step 3: More services inside most open branches

29/07/2021

Browsing, public computers, newspapers and magazines are available inside most of our 31 open branches, with capacity limits for two-metre distancing. Up to 200 items can also be put on hold.

Starting July 26:

Mask-wearing remains mandatory inside, and outside in line. For more details, go to Current Branch Services.

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Harvesting Seed and Propagating Native Perennials for your Garden

Seeds, preserves jar, cutting back plants

As the benefits of planting native wildflowers for pollinators are becoming more widely recognized, people are looking for cost-effective ways to increase the offerings of native plants in their gardens. Fortunately, the same hardiness that makes many native plants easy to grow and maintain also makes them easy to propagate.  

Join Sheila Currie, Master Gardener, as she shows how she works with species of native perennials, dividing them and harvesting their seeds to germinate them.  As a result of her work, Sheila has more than enough seedlings for her own gardens, as well as to give away to neighbours and friends.  We will focus on coreopsis, 'showy' milkweeds, woodland sunflowers, coneflowers, virginia waterleaf, anise hyssop and others.

Do your birds, bees, butterflies and bugs a favour and amp up your native plants!

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A social sciences researcher by profession, Sheila Currie took her first horticultural course at University of Guelph in 2017 and joined Master Gardeners of Ottawa-Carleton. She continues to take courses in horticulture and landscape ecology from her rural home in Hastings County, where she moved at the onset of COVID, and became a Master Gardener in 2020.  A lifelong nature-lover, she has a new and even greater appreciation for the local flora and fauna from her daily interaction with their environment.